Let’s Talk About Building a Powerful Movement for Social Change

Let’s Talk About Building a Powerful Movement for Social Change

I recently had the honor of attending the Compassionate Communities conference put on by the irrepressible Kelly Miller, and her fantastic colleagues at the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence

At this convening, over 400 advocates from across various fields gathered to imagine what it would truly look like to create a community in which every family can thrive. I loved being in this space with direct service providers, including counselors, social workers, lawyers, law enforcement, educators, and domestic and sexual violence advocates, who are all thinking about how they can help to create change.

In my talk, I focused on three things we need to build a powerful movement for social change:

  • First, a positive, pro-active vision of what we are for – the world we want to create;
  • Second, a practice for developing real solutions that will move us toward that vision; and
  • Third, an understanding that we all have a role in realizing this vision and, by working together, we can build the power we’ll need to affect that change.

In a stroke of great fortune, my talk was followed by that of my friend and colleague, Miriam Yeung, Executive Director of NAPAWF and Co-Director of We Belong Together. As you may recall, Move to Violence hosted a webinar last year with We Belong Together to learn from that movement’s efforts to promote immigration reform.Their inspiring work is something we can all continue to learn from and support! Click here to see how you can engage in their latest effort to keep families together.

Watched in tandem, these two talks build a strong case for what a powerful movement for social justice can look like. We’d love to hear what you think!

Jackie Payne
Jackie Payne

Jackie Payne served as the Director of Move to End Violence from its inception until February 2018. A lawyer and policy advocate with 20 years of experience working to affect social change, Jackie brings an intersectional and cross-movement lens to her gender justice work. Learn More

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