What Changes When We See Our Struggles and Our Liberation as Interdependent?

What Changes When We See Our Struggles and Our Liberation as Interdependent?

In our recent interview with immigrant rights leader Pramila Jayapal, we asked her: Can you talk about a missed opportunity where women were not at the center of a strategy and it made a difference in the outcome of a campaign or advocacy effort? What was the big takeaway? Read this blog to hear what Pramila had to say and join the dialogue about connecting her thoughts to the movement to end violence against girls and women.

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Here’s what Pramila had to say:

Well, the debate on jobs is something I have been pondering. Could we build a really strong gender analysis around jobs? Women in the labor force are becoming so much more prevalent and there is so much to build on that could help us carry a powerful jobs campaign, particularly since women are now taking on so much of the low-wage work in the country. I also wonder if we could have done more on health care. It’s possible it was out there and I didn’t know about it, so that’s my caveat. Certainly attacks on groups like Planned Parenthood and NARAL as parts of health care were opportunities that were well-utilized to put women at the center, and Moms Rising dis some incredible work on this. But could we have done even more if we built a really strong gender analysis that went beyond what are traditionally seen as women’s health issues, and communicated it out better? Part of this is also that really good efforts that exist around gender and an issue aren’t always given the resources to carry it out further. Funders need to start thinking about–or even requiring!–their grants to have a very specific and intentional gender component to the work, in my opinion.

Making Connections to the Movement to End Violence Against Girls and Women

We’d love to hear YOUR thoughts: What about this movement? Are we striving to improve our intersectional analysis and center that in our work? What do we need to be asking folks in allied movements? How we get them to build a strong gender analysis? What would that take?

Please share your thoughts via a comment below.

 

 

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