Move to End Violence is a 10-year initiative designed to strengthen our collective capacity to end violence against girls and women in the United States.

Blog: On the Move

Relationships 2.0

By Trina Greene | November 18, 2014

When I first joined Move to End Violence as a Movement Maker, one of my first blogs was about the power of relationships to build a sustainable movement to end violence against girls and women. After attending the Rockwood Art of Leadership training as part of my participation in Move to End Violence, I developed a deeper understanding of the importance of relationship building from the concept of coniociomento.

Read More >

It Has to Stop: Warehousing Women and Children is Inhumane

By Archi Pyati | November 13, 2014

[Crossposted from Huffington Post] Sophie,* a little two year-old girl with brown eyes and pigtails, squirmed around in front of me, restless, like any toddler. I kept trying to make her smile, using the silly faces and peek-a-boo tricks that worked on my kids when they were that age, but she was reluctant. She was coughing constantly and looked tired, and it was cold in that tiny, white-washed, cinder-blocked room.

Read More >

It Has to Stop: Warehousing Women and Children is Inhumane

By Archi Pyati | November 13, 2014

[Crossposted from Huffington Post] Sophie,* a little two year-old girl with brown eyes and pigtails, squirmed around in front of me, restless, like any toddler. I kept trying to make her smile, using the silly faces and peek-a-boo tricks that worked on my kids when they were that age, but she was reluctant. She was coughing constantly and looked tired, and it was cold in that tiny, white-washed, cinder-blocked room.

Read More >

Practicing for Miracles

By Stacy Kono | October 02, 2014

There is a quote by Thich Nhat Hanh posted up at the Rockwood offices above the kitchen sink. It reads:

Read More >

How I Honor My Heartbeat

By Archi Pyati | September 17, 2014

Heartbeats: The IZZAT Project is a graphic novel written by young, South Asian women who are survivors of violence. Their stories are painful to read: the pressure to conform to multiple ideals and the resulting family conflict and inner struggle are unpleasant to witness. They show us graphically what they want us to see – their lives, in plain lines, but utterly complicated. 

The women who wrote the book happen to be South Asian, but the message from their book transcends: Pay attention. Make the invisible visible.  Listen to us.

Read More >

Stay in Touch

Facebook  Twitter